Sep 22, 2019  
2019-2020 Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Catalog

Student Conduct



Student Code of Conduct

In order to support a positive, safe, and productive learning environment for the entire College community, all students are expected to abide by the Pikes Peak Community College Student Code of Conduct. Conduct that violates student rights and freedoms and is subject to disciplinary action includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Academic Misconduct
    Plagiarizing, cheating, or committing any other form of academic misconduct including, but not limited to, unauthorized collaboration, falsification of information, and/or helping someone else violate reasonable standards for academic behavior. Students who engage in any type of academic dishonesty are subject to both academic consequences as determined by the instructor and to disciplinary action as outlined in the Pikes Peak Community College disciplinary procedures (Colorado Community College System President’s Procedure SP4-30).
  2. Disruptive Behavior
    Engaging in any disruptive behavior that negatively affects or impedes teaching or learning (regardless of mode of delivery or class setting); or disrupts the general operation of the college.
  3. Deceitful Acts
    Engaging in deceitful acts, including, but not limited to: forgery, falsification, alteration, misrepresentation, non-disclosure, or misuse of documents, records, identification and/or educational materials.
  4. Conduct that is Detrimental to College or to Safety
    Conduct that is deemed detrimental, harmful and/or damaging to the college and/or that jeopardizes the safety of others as determined by the Pikes Peak Community College Dean of Students. Examples include, but are not limited to, slamming doors, throwing chairs, and/or defacing of college property.
  5. Physical/Non-physical Abuse
    • Physical abuse or conduct that threatens or endangers another person’s health or safety.
    • Non-physical abuse, threats, intimidation, coercion, influence, or any unwelcome conduct in any form that is sufficiently severe, pervasive or persistent that it alters the conditions of the learning environment or employment.
    • Knowingly falsifying, publishing or distributing, in any form, material that tends to impeach the honesty, integrity, virtue or reputation of another person
  6. Harassment and/or Discrimination
    Discrimination or harassment on the basis of sex/gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion or sexual orientation.
  7. Sexual Misconduct
    Sexual Misconduct offenses include, but are not limited to Sexual Harassment, Non-Consensual Sexual Contact (or attempts to commit same), Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse (or attempts to commit same), and/or Sexual Exploitation. (See SP 4-120a for more information: www.cccs.edu/sp-4-120a-sexual-misconduct/).
  8. Weapons
    Possession or distribution of any unauthorized firearms, ammunition, explosives, fireworks and/or other dangerous weapons (or chemicals) or use/threat of use of any instrument as a weapon to intimidate, harass, or cause harm to others.
  9. Narcotics/Alcohol
    Use, being under the influence, manufacturing, possession, distribution, purchase, or sale of alcohol and/or drugs (illegal and/or dangerous or controlled substance) while on college-owned or college-controlled property, and/or at any function authorized or supervised by the college and/or in state owned or leased vehicles.

    Note: Although possession and use of marijuana consistent with the requirements of the Colorado Constitution is no longer a crime in the State of Colorado, the possession and use of marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Consistent with federal law, including the Controlled Substances Act and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, the use and/or possession of marijuana continues to be prohibited while a student is on college owned or college controlled property, and/or any function authorized or supervised by the college and/or in state owned or leased vehicles.
  10. Dress Code
    Dress or personal hygiene that fails to meet the established safety or health standards of specific classes or activities offered by the college.
  11. Leaving Children Unattended
    Leaving children unattended or unsupervised in campus buildings or on campus grounds unless enrolled or participating in authorized campus activities.
  12. Violation of Laws, Directives, and Signage
    • Violating any municipal, county, state or federal law that adversely impacts the conditions of the educational or employment environment.
    • Violations of college traffic and parking rules, regulations, or signage.
    • Creating an intentional obstruction that unreasonably interferes with freedom of movement, either pedestrian or vehicular. This includes, but is not limited to leading or inciting to disrupt college activities. Failure to comply with the lawful directives of College employees acting within the scope of their duties, including those directives issued by a College administrator to ensure the safety and well-being of others.
    • Violations of college policies, protocols, or procedures.
  13. Illegal Gambling
    Participation in illegal gambling activities on college owned or college controlled property, and/or any function authorized or supervised by the college and/or in state owned or leased vehicles.
  14. Unauthorized Entry and/or Unauthorized Possession
    Entry into or use of any building, room, or other college-owned or college-controlled property, grounds, or activities without authorized approval. This also includes, but is not limited to the unauthorized possession, duplication or use of college keys, lock combinations, access codes, and access cards and/or credentials.
  15. Unacceptable Use of College Equipment, Network or System
    Unacceptable uses of any college-owned or operated equipment, network or system including, but not limited to: knowingly spreading computer viruses; reposting personal communications without author’s consent; copying protected materials; using the network for financial or personal gain, commercial activity, or illegal activity; accessing the network using another individuals account; unauthorized downloading/uploading software and/or digital video or music; downloading/uploading, viewing or displaying pornographic content, or any other attempt to compromise network integrity.
  16. Unauthorized Pets/Animals
    Possession of any unauthorized pet or animal, excluding trained service animals while on college-owned or college-controlled property.
  17. Tampering with Student Organization, Election, or Vote
    Tampering with the process of any college recognized student organization, election or vote.
  18. Group or Organization Conduct
    Students who are members of a college recognized student organization or group and commit a violation of SCOC may be accountable both as an individual and as a member of the student organization.
  19. Abuse of the Student Disciplinary and/or Grievance Procedure
    Abuse of the Student Disciplinary and/or Grievance Procedure includes, but is not limited to the following:
    • Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of the student disciplinary/grievance procedure.
    • Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation, or knowingly pursuing malicious, frivolous, or fraudulent charges.
    • Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the student disciplinary/grievance procedure.
    • Attempting to influence the impartiality of a participant and/or the student disciplinary/grievance procedure.
    • Harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of a participant in the student disciplinary/grievance procedure.
    • Failure to comply with directives and/or sanctions imposed under student disciplinary/grievance procedure.
    • Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the student disciplinary/grievance procedure.
    • Engaging in retaliatory acts in any form against any person or person(s) involved in the student disciplinary/grievance procedure
  20. Official college communication will be sent to your college email

Please note: In most circumstances, Pikes Peak Community College will treat attempts to commit code of conduct violations as if those attempts have been completed.

At Pikes Peak Community College, administration of the disciplinary and grievance procedures is the responsibility of the Dean of Students.

Student Disciplinary Procedure

Reference
Board Policy (BP) 4-30; System President’s Procedure (SP) 4-31a

Application
The procedure applies to students within the Colorado Community College System (CCCS).

Basis
Students are expected to adhere to the Student Code of Conduct and policies and procedures of the College. If a student is charged with violating her/his College’s Code, these are the procedures to be used in resolving the charge.

Definitions
Chief Student Services Officer (CSSO): The individual designated by the College President to administer student affairs and be responsible for administering the College’s Student Code of Conduct and this procedure. The CSSO may delegate student discipline to another individual (designee).

Code of Conduct: A document developed and published by each College which defines prescribed conduct of students.

Complainant(s): A person(s) who is subject to the alleged misconduct or related retaliation. For purposes of this procedure, a complainant can be a CCCS employee(s), student(s), authorized volunteer(s), guest(s), or visitor(s).

Day: Refers to working day unless otherwise noted below.

Jurisdiction: Applies to behaviors that take place on the campus, at System or College sponsored events; and may also apply off-campus and to online activity when the Chief Student Services Officer (CSSO), or designee, determines that the off-campus conduct affects a substantial System or College interest. A substantial College interest is defined to include the following:

  • Any action that constitutes criminal offense as defined by federal or Colorado law. This includes, but is not limited to, single or repeat violations of any local, state or federal law committed in the municipality where the System or the College is located;
  • Any situation where it appears that the accused individual may present a danger or threat to the health or safety of self or others;
  • Any situation that significantly impinges upon the rights, property or achievements of self or others or significantly breaches the peace and/or causes social disorder; and/or
  • Any situation that is detrimental to the educational interests of the System or the College.

Any online postings or other electronic communication by students, including cyber-bullying, cyber-stalking, cyber-harassment, etc. occurring completely outside of the System or the College’s control (e.g., not on System or College networks, websites or between System or College email accounts) will only be subject to this procedure when those online behaviors can be shown to cause a substantial on-campus disruption. Otherwise, such communications are considered speech protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution.

Notice: Notices which are required to be given by this procedure shall be considered served upon the student when given by personal delivery, mailing by certified mail, or emailing the student to their official College email address requesting a delivery receipt notification. If notice is mailed, student shall be given three (3) additional days to respond.

Respondent: A student whose alleged conduct is the subject of a complaint or incident.

Retaliatory Acts: Include but not limited to intimidation, verbal or physical threats, harassment, coercion, or other adverse action(s) against a person who reports an incident of misconduct.

Sanctions: One or more of the following may be imposed when there is a finding that a student has violated the College’s Code of Conduct.

  1. Warning: A Notice served upon the student advising him/her that he/she is violating or has violated College regulations.
  2. Probation: After a finding of violation of the Code of Conduct, restriction of student’s privileges for a designated period of time including the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating any College regulations during the probationary period.
  3. Other Disciplinary Sanction: Fines, restitution, denial of privileges (including extra-curricular activities or holding office in student organizations), assignment to perform services for the benefit of the College or community; educational sanctions such as mediation, letter of reflection, attendance at a workshop, seminar, or training writing a letter of apology seeking academic advising; re-assignment or eviction from campus housing, substance abuse screening, re-assignment to another class section, including a potential online section, or other sanction that doesn’t result in the student being denied the right of attending classes, or any combination of these.
  4. College Suspension or Expulsion: An involuntary separation of the student from the College for misconduct not based on academic performance for a specified period of time.
    1. Suspension is a separation that shall not exceed three academic terms (including summer term) per suspension for any singular offense or situation. While a student is suspended, he or she is not eligible for admission or readmission at any of the community Colleges within the System.
      Additionally, if a student is suspended at any of the other Auraria Campus Institutions (i.e., Metropolitan State University of Denver [MSUD] or the University of Colorado Denver [UCD]), he or she will not be eligible for admission or re-admission at the Community College of Denver (CCD). Consequently, if a student is suspended at MSUD or UCD and attempts to enroll at one of the other twelve community Colleges within the System, he or she may be denied pursuant to the process under Board Policy 4-10, Admission, Continued Enrollment and Re-enrollment of Students.
      Once the suspension is lifted at any of the community Colleges within the System, MSUD or UCD, the student may be eligible for admission or re-admission.
      Examples of suspension include, but are not limited to the following: the College, a department or program, a class, use of a College facility or an activity.
      Students may be suspended from one class period by the responsible faculty member or adjunct instructor. Longer suspensions can only be implemented by the CSSO or designee in accordance with this procedure.
    2. Expulsion is an indefinite separation from the College. The expelled student is not eligible for admission or readmission at any of the community Colleges within the System.
      Additionally, if a student is expelled at MSUD or UCD, he or she will not be eligible for admission or re-admission at CCD.
      Consequently, if a student is expelled at MSUD or UCD and attempts to enroll at one of the other twelve community Colleges within the System, he or she may be denied pursuant to the process under Board Policy 4-10, Admission, Continued Enrollment and Re-enrollment of Students.
      In exceptional cases where a student wants to be considered for admission or re-admission after an expulsion has been implemented, the student bears the burden to prove the behavior resulting in the expulsion has been resolved. It is the College’s discretion to admit or deny the student.
  5. Interim Action: An immediate action taken by the CSSO or designee, to ensure the safety and well-being of members of the System or College community; preservation of System or College property; or if the student poses a definite threat of disruption or interference to others or the normal operations of the System or College. In the event of an interim action, the hearing before the CSSO or designee shall occur as soon as possible following the interim action. If the College issues a permanent sanction, the student shall be afforded appeal rights as discussed below. If the College does not implement a permanent sanction, the interim action will be removed from the student’s record.
  6. The College may issue a “Cease Communications”, “No Contact”, and/or “No Trespass” directive, also referred to as a persona non grata.

Student: All persons currently taking courses at or sponsored by the College(s), pursuing either credit and non-credit courses (or both), including those concurrently attending secondary or post-secondary institutions and College. Persons who are not officially enrolled for a specific term, but who have a continuing relationship with the College are considered students.

Continuing Relationship: A student registered for an upcoming term or has indicated intent via a transaction such as a financial aid application to register for an upcoming term. A continuing relationship also includes students who are first time enrollees who engage in misconduct prior to the time of enrollment. For students in a continuing relationship status, jurisdiction and the reasonable person standard must be considered in pursuing disciplinary charges. The Student Conduct Code shall apply to a student’s conduct even if the student withdraws from school while a disciplinary matter is pending.

Title IX Coordinator(s) and Title VI and VII Coordinator(s) (EO Coordinator): Designated by the College President to oversee all civil rights complaints.

Training: All College officials involved with the investigation and discipline process will be trained annually on the issues related to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

Procedures

The CSSO or designee shall receive all allegations of student misconduct, investigate the complaints, which includes meeting with the student to give him/her the opportunity to respond to the allegations of misconduct. If the allegations of misconduct are discrimination and/or harassment based on federal or state civil rights laws, the College will investigate those incidents through the Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation Process, System President’s Procedures (SP) 3-50b and (SP) 4-31a via the following link: www.cccs.edu/about-cccs/state-board/policies-procedures/.

Once the investigation is complete, either through this process or the Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation Process, the CSSO or designee shall render a sanction decision.

The CSSO or designee may decide that the charges can be disposed of administratively by mutual consent of the parties involved on a basis acceptable to them. If an administrative resolution is not achieved, the CSSO or designee shall issue a decision which determines whether the alleged conduct occurred; whether the conduct violated the Code of Conduct or College procedures; and impose a sanction(s) if appropriate.

In cases of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking, the complainant and the respondent will be notified simultaneously in writing of the outcome of any disciplinary proceeding, as well as any changes to those results or disciplinary actions prior to the time that such results become final and shall be given the rationale for the discipline decision.

The student shall receive written notice of the decision and be advised of her/his right to appeal the decision, subject to the grounds below, by filing a written appeal with the CSSO or designee within seven (7) days of service of the decision.

Appeal

In the event of an appeal, the CSSO or designee shall give written notice to the other party (e.g., if the accused student appeals, the appeal is shared with the complainant who may also wish to file a response), and then the CSSO or designee will draft a response memorandum (also shared with all parties). All appeals and responses are then forwarded to the Appeals Officer or committee for initial review to determine if the appeal meets the limited grounds and is timely. The original finding(s) and sanction(s) will stand if the appeal is not timely or substantively eligible, and the decision is final.

If the appeal has standing, the documentation is reviewed. Because the original finding(s) and sanction(s) are presumed to have been decided reasonably and appropriately, the party appealing the decision must specifically cite the error(s) in the original determination on which the appeal is based. The only grounds for appeal are as follows:

  1. A material procedural or substantive error occurred that significantly impacted the outcome of the hearing (e.g. substantiated bias, material deviation from established procedures); which must be explained in the written appeal; or
  2. To consider new evidence, unavailable during the investigation or hearing that could substantially impact the original finding or sanction. A summary of this new evidence and its potential impact must be included in the written appeal, as well as the reasons the new evidence was not available during the original proceeding. Failure to participate in the initial process does not constitute as new information for the appeal process.

If the Appeals Officer or committee determines that a material procedural or substantive error occurred, it may return the complaint to the CSSO or designee with instructions to reconvene, in order to cure the error. In rare cases of bias, where the procedural or substantive error cannot be cured by the CSSO or designee, the Appeals Officer or committee may order that a new hearing be held by a different individual acting in the place of the designated CSSO or designee. The results of a reconvened hearing cannot be appealed. The results of a new hearing can be appealed once on (either or both of) the two applicable grounds for appeals.

If the Appeals Officer or committee determines that new evidence should be considered, it will return the complaint to the CSSO or designee to reconsider in light of the new evidence, only. If the subject matter pertains to civil rights violations pursuant to SP 4-31a, the Appeals Officer or committee will return the complaint to the Title IX/EO Coordinator to reconsider in light of the new evidence, only. The reconsideration of the CSSO, designee, or Title IX/EO Coordinator is not appealable.

The procedures governing the hearing of appeals include the following:

  • All parties should be timely informed of the status of requests for appeal, the status of the appeal consideration, and the results of the appeal decision.
  • If the Appeals Officer or committee determines there is new evidence or error in the original proceeding, every opportunity to return the appeal to the CSSO or designee for reconsideration (remand) should be pursued.
  • Appeals are not intended to be a full rehearing of the complaint (de novo). In most cases, appeals are confined to a review of the written documentation or record of the original hearing, and pertinent documentation regarding the grounds for appeal.
  • An appeal is not an opportunity for an Appeals Officer or committee to substitute their judgment for that of the CSSO or designee, merely because they disagree with her/his finding and/or sanctions.
  • Appeals decisions are to be deferential to the original decision, making changes to the findings only where there is clear error and a compelling justification to do so.
  • Sanctions imposed are implemented immediately unless the CSSO or designee stays their implementation in extraordinary circumstances, pending the outcome of the appeal.
  • The Appeals Officer or committee will render a written decision on the appeal to all parties within seven (7) days of receiving the appeal request. The committee’s decision to deny appeal requests is final.

Additional Process Provisions

  • The student may have the opportunity to be advised by a personal advisor of their choice, at their expense, at any stage of the process and to be accompanied by that advisor at any meeting or hearing. An advisor may only consult and advise her/his advisee, but not speak for the advisee at any meeting or hearing. These procedures are entirely administrative in nature and are not considered legal proceedings. The CSSO may remove or dismiss an advisor who becomes disruptive or who does not abide by the restrictions on their participation.
  • The student is responsible for presenting his/her own case and, therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any hearing, except when the student is under the age of eighteen (18) or incapacitated.
  • Student shall have the right to identify documents, witnesses and other material he/she would like the CSSO or designee to review before making a final decision.
  • Any hearing held shall be conducted in private unless all parties agree otherwise.
  • A record of the hearing should be maintained by the CSSO or designee.
  • Audio and/or Video Recording - the College, at its discretion, may audio or video record any meeting throughout the process. Should a recording exist, the student may request a copy at the end of the process. No other audio or video recording will be allowed.
  • If student has a disability and would like to request an accommodation to assist him/her through the discipline process they may do so by informing the CSSO or designee. The CSSO or designee will then work with disability support services to accommodate the request.
  • Proceedings under this procedure may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off-campus.
  • Standard of proof - the College will use the preponderance of evidence standard in the disciplinary proceedings, meaning, the College will determine whether it is more likely than not a conduct code was violated.
  • All sanctions imposed by the original decision maker will be in effect during the appeal. A request may be made to the CSSO or designee for special consideration in exigent circumstances, but the presumptive stance of the College is that the sanctions will stand. Graduation, study abroad, internships/externships, clinical placements, extracurricular activities, etc. do not (in and of themselves) constitute exigent circumstances, and students may not be able to participate in those activities during their appeal. In cases where the appeal results in reinstatement to the College or of privileges, all reasonable attempts will be made to restore the student to their prior status, recognizing that some opportunities lost may be irretrievable in the short term.
  • The procedural rights afforded to students above may be waived by the student.
  • All timelines may be extended as agreed upon by both parties.

Retaliatory Acts

It is a violation of this procedure to engage in retaliatory acts against any employee or student who reports an incident(s) of Code of Conduct violations or any employee or student who testifies, assists or participates in the discipline proceeding, investigation or hearing relating to such allegation(s) of Code of Conduct violations.

Revising this Procedure

CCCS reserves the right to change any provision or requirement of this procedure at any time and the change shall become effective immediately.

Student Grievance Procedure

Reference
Board Policy 4-31; SP 4-31a

Application
The procedure applies to students within the Colorado Community College System (CCCS).

Basis
This Student Grievance Procedure is intended to allow students an opportunity to present an issue which they feel warrants action, including the right to secure educational benefits and services.

If the basis of the claim is discrimination and/ or harassment based on federal or state civil rights laws, the student must file a grievance under the Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation Process. If the accused (respondent) is a student, please refer to SP 4-31a. If the respondent is a CCCS employee, please refer to SP 3-50a.

Definitions

Complainant(s) is a person who is subject to alleged inequity as it applies to Board Policies, System President’s Procedures, or College Procedures. For purposes of this procedure, a complainant is student who was enrolled at the time of the alleged incident.

Respondent(s) is a person whose alleged conduct is the subject of a complaint. For purposes of this procedure, a respondent can be a CCCS employee(s), student(s) who was enrolled at the time of the alleged incident, authorized volunteer(s), guest(s), visitor(s), or college.

Grievance: A grievable offense is any alleged action which violates or inequitably applies State Board Policies, System President’s Procedures, and College Procedures. The complainant must be personally affected by such violation or inequitable action.

Non-grievable matters: The following matters are not grievable under this procedure except as noted: matters over which the college is without authority to act; grades and other academic decisions unless there is an allegation that the decision was motivated by discrimination and/or harassment which should be filed under the appropriate Civil Rights Grievance and Investigation Process.

Chief Student Services Officer (CSSO): The college employee designated by the college president to administer student grievances. The CSSO may delegate the responsibility over student grievances to another person.

Notice: Notices which are required to be given by this procedure shall be considered served upon the student when given by personal delivery, mailing by certified mail, or email with receipt notification to the address the student has filed with the College’s admissions and records office. If notice is mailed, student shall be given three (3) additional days to respond.

Day: Refers to calendar day unless otherwise noted below.

Remedy: The relief that the Grievant is requesting.

Filing a Complaint

All complaints shall be made as promptly as possible after the occurrence. A delay in reporting may be reasonable under some circumstances; however, an unreasonable delay in reporting is an appropriate consideration in evaluating the merits of a complaint or report.

Procedures

Students must timely submit all grievances in writing (See Appendix) to the CSSO. The grievance should clearly and concisely describe the alleged incident(s), when and where it occurred, and the desired remedy sought. The grievance should be signed by the initiator or, in the case of an email submission, sent as an email attachment, in letter format and should contain the name and all contact information for the grievant. Any supporting documentation and evidence should be referenced within the body of the formal grievance. Additionally, the initiator of a formal grievance should submit any supporting materials in writing as quickly as is practicable.

The complainant’s supporting documentation should clearly demonstrate all informal efforts, if any, to resolve the issue(s) with the person involved and the person’s supervisor. This includes names, dates and times of attempted or actual contact along with a description of the discussion and the manner of communication made in the course of each effort. If contacting the person involved and/or the supervisor is impracticable, the complainant should state the reasons why.

The CCCS community benefits from informal and formal procedures that encourage prompt resolution of complaints and concerns students may have about the implementation of policies and procedures that govern the institution.

Informal Grievance Process

Complainant is encouraged to resolve the issue with the Respondent through the informal process. The CSSO shall facilitate the informal process. If the informal grievance process is unsuccessful, or if CCCS or the complainant chooses not to pursue the informal process, the CSSO will open a formal grievance case.

Formal Grievance Process

Complainant must timely file a written statement of the actions complained of and describes the remedy s/he is seeking with the CSSO. A matter could also be referred to this process by the College president or his/her designee. Once a written grievance is filed or referred, the CSSO or designee will determine whether or not the situation states a grievable offense. The matter will be closed if the situation is determined not grievable and the Complainant will be notified of the reasons.

If the matter is determined to be grievable, the CSSO will request a meeting (hearing) with both the complainant and respondent. Both parties will be given the opportunity to discuss the allegations of the grievance and may offer any documentation, witnesses, or other materials in support of the complaint. During this hearing, neither party may have a representative, including attorneys or law students. These procedures are entirely administrative in nature and are not considered legal proceedings.

No audio or video recording of any kind other than as required by institutional procedure is permitted.

The CSSO may also contact or request a meeting with relevant college staff, students, or others as part of the investigation.

At the CSSO’s discretion, the CSSO may discontinue meetings with anyone that is causing a disruption to the process or is being uncooperative, and will proceed to make a determination based on the information known at that time.

Based on the preponderance of evidence, the CSSO shall issue a decision, in writing, to both the complainant and respondent. The decision shall reject or grant the grievance and make recommendation(s) to resolve the issue(s). The complainant and respondent shall be advised of his/her right to appeal the decision, subject to the grounds below, by filing a written appeal with the CSSO within seven (7) days of service of the Decision.

In the event of an appeal, the CSSO shall give written notice to the other party to allow him/her the opportunity to submit a response in writing. The CSSO will also draft a response memorandum (also shared with all parties). All appeals and responses are then forwarded to the appeals officer or committee for initial review to determine if the appeal meets the limited grounds and is timely. The original finding will stand if the appeal is not timely or substantively eligible, and the decision is final. If the appeal has standing, the documentation is forwarded for consideration. The party requesting appeal must show error as the original finding is presumed to have been decided reasonably and appropriately. The ONLY grounds for appeal are as follows:

  1. A procedural or substantive error occurred that significantly impacted the outcome of the hearing (e.g. substantiated bias, material deviation from established procedures); or
  2. To consider new evidence, unavailable during the original hearing or investigation, that could substantially impact the original finding. A summary of this new evidence and its potential impact must be included in the written appeal.

If the appeals officer or committee determines that new evidence should be considered, it will return the complaint to the CSSO to reconsider in light of the new evidence, only.

If the appeals officer or committee determines that a material procedural or substantive error occurred, it may return the complaint to the CSSO with instructions to reconvene the hearing to cure the error. In rare cases, where the procedural or substantive error cannot be cured by the CSSO in cases of bias, the appeals officer or committee may order a new hearing be held by a different individual acting in the place of the designated CSSO. The results of a reconvened hearing cannot be appealed. The results of a new hearing can be appealed, once, on the two applicable grounds for appeals.

Special Grievance Process Provisions

  • In the event that the student is under the age of eighteen or incapacitated, s/he may have an advisor present to assist him/her in presenting his/her case.
  • Students do not have the right to be represented by an attorney or law student during these proceedings except in the case where civil or criminal actions concerning the student are pending and in that case the attorney’s role shall be advisory only.
  • The student is responsible for presenting his/her own case and, therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any hearing except when the student is under the age of eighteen or incapacitated.
  • Student shall have the right to identify documents, witnesses and other material he/she would like the CSSO to review before making a final decision.
  • Any hearing held shall be conducted in private unless all parties agree otherwise.
  • A record of the hearing should be maintained by the CSSO.
  • If student has a disability and would like to request an accommodation to assist him/her through the grievance process they may do so by informing the CSSO. The CSSO will then work with disability support services to accommodate the request.
  • If the grievance is against the CSSO, the Chief Academic Officer or other person designated by the president shall perform the duties of the CSSO.
  • Jurisdiction-College grievance proceedings may be instituted over incidences that occur or are related to College or college-sanctioned activities or was of such a nature to impact upon the college.
  • Proceedings under this procedure may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off-campus.
  • Standard of proof-the college will use the preponderance of evidence standard in the grievance proceedings, meaning, the college will determine whether it is more likely than not the complainant was subjected to inequity as it applies to Board Policies, System President’s Procedures, or College procedures.
  • The procedural rights afforded to students above may be waived by the student.

Retaliatory Acts

It is a violation of the grievance procedure to engage in retaliatory acts against any employee or student who files a grievance or any employee or student who testifies, assists or participates in the grievance proceeding, investigation or hearing relating to such grievance.

Revising this Procedure

CCCS reserves the right to change any provision or requirement of this procedure at any time and the change shall become effective immediately.

For information about the student grievance process, contact the Dean of Students office, 719-502-2367.

Academic Honesty

Students are expected to conduct themselves according to the highest standards of honesty in the classroom, shop, or laboratory. Failure to do so is grounds for disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion from Pikes Peak Community College.

Academic honesty is a fundamental value of higher education. It means that you respect the right of other individuals to express their views and that you do not plagiarize, cheat, falsify, or illegally access College records or academic work. You are expected to read, understand and follow the Student Code of Conduct.

Academic dishonesty is defined as the unauthorized use of assistance with intent to deceive a faculty member or another person assigned to evaluate work submitted to meet course and program requirements. Examples of academic dishonesty include but are not limited to the following:

  • the submission, in whole or part, of material prepared by another person and represented as one’s own
  • plagiarism, which is defined as the act of taking the writings, ideas, etc., of another person and passing them off as one’s own
  • the unauthorized use of notes, books, or other materials; the deliberate, unacknowledged reference to the work of another student; or the soliciting of assistance from another person during an examination
  • illegitimate possession and/or distribution of test materials or answer keys
  • unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of official academic records

Classroom Attendance Procedure

Individuals not enrolled in a class are not permitted to sit in the classroom while the class is in session. Faculty members are encouraged to take attendance and anyone not on the class list will be asked to leave the classroom. The only exception to this procedure is for specially trained interpreters necessary for disabled students.

Conduct in College Buildings

By Colorado Executive Order, smoking tobacco products is not permitted in any College facility. Smoking tobacco products includes the use of cigars, cigarettes and electronic smoking devises (i.e. e-cigarettes).

Eating or drinking is not permitted in classrooms, laboratories, shops, the theatre, and the gymnasium, except when permission is granted by the person immediately responsible for supervision of the affected area.

Animals, except when needed for instruction or by disabled persons, are not allowed in any College building. Animals on the College grounds must be on a leash.

Leaving children unattended or unsupervised in campus buildings or on campus grounds can constitute child abuse or child neglect (as outlined in the Colorado Child Protection Act of 1975). Children are not permitted in classrooms during class meeting times.

The College may require students to pay replacement or repair costs for College equipment lost, broken, or damaged through carelessness, negligence, or misconduct.

Restricted Attendance

Faculty may suspend students from one class period if their conduct is obstructive, disruptive, or unacceptable in an instructional setting. Students may return to class after the faculty member has identified the conditions to allow continued attendance. If students return and these conditions are violated, the appropriate dean will review the circumstances and provide information to the Dean of Students. This information shall state the appropriate administrative action, which may include continued attendance or permanent dismissal from the class as outlined in the Student Disciplinary Procedure.

Alcohol and Drug Policies

General

In compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989 (Public Law 101-226), students, staff, or faculty shall not engage in the unauthorized or unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, use/abuse of alcohol and/or illicit drugs of any kind or any amount on college property or as part of any college activity. This prohibition applies even if the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has issued a Medical Marijuana Registry identification card to an individual, permitting that individual to possess a limited amount of marijuana for medicinal purposes. Those with medical marijuana cards are not permitted to use medical marijuana on campus. These prohibitions cover any individual’s actions which are part of any college activities, including those occurring while on college property or in the conduct of college business away from the campus.

Any student, staff, or faculty member who is convicted of the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, use, or abuse of illicit drugs or alcohol is subject to criminal penalties under local, state, or federal law. These penalties range in severity from a fine of $100 up to $8,000,000 and/or life imprisonment. The exact penalty assessed depends upon the nature and the severity of the individual offense.

The college will impose penalties against students who violate the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (Public Law 101-226). Violators will be subject to disciplinary action under student disciplinary policies. The sanctions include but are not limited to probation, suspension, or expulsion from the college, termination of employment, and referral to authorities for prosecution, as appropriate.

Compliance with drug and alcohol policies is a condition of employment for all PPCC employees. Employees may be subject to corrective and/or disciplinary action as per State Personnel Rules and Regulations, up to and including termination. The Executive Director of Human Resource Services sends a campus-wide E-memo each year to inform staff of the college’s policy on alcohol and other drugs.

For further information, contact the Human Resource Services Office or the Campus Life Office at the Centennial Campus.

Laws and Statutes

Federal and state laws govern the use and possession of controlled substances.

PPCC 2015 Annual Security Report 50

Excerpts from Colorado Revised Statue (CRS) 18-18-405:

Except as specifically authorized under Colorado law, it is unlawful for any person knowingly to manufacture, dispense, sell, or distribute, or to possess with intent to manufacture, dispense, sell, or distribute, a controlled substance; or induce, attempt to induce, or conspire with one or more other persons, to manufacture, dispense, sell, distribute, or possess with intent to manufacture, dispense, sell, or distribute, a controlled substance; or possess one or more chemicals or supplies or equipment with intent to manufacture a controlled substance.

Except as is otherwise provided for offenses concerning marijuana and marijuana concentrate in and for offenses involving minors, any person who violates the foregoing prohibition commits a Felony Offense.

All drug possession charges and penalties are classified by Schedule, except for Marijuana possession.

Substance/Drug Charge Potential Sentence for Possession:

  • Schedule I or II, 1st offense Class 3 Felony 4-12 years in prison and fines of $3,000-$750,000
  • Schedule III, 1st offense Class 4 felony 2-6 years in prison and fines of $2,000-$500,000
  • Schedule IV, 1st offense Class 5 felony 1-3 years in prison and fines of $1,000-$100,000
  • Schedule V, 1st offense Class 1 misdemeanor 6-18 months in jail and fines of $500-$5,000

Alcohol

Pikes Peak Community College does not allow the sale of alcohol on any of its campuses. However, the Substance Abuse Procedure for Employees permits the use of alcohol on campus when approved by the President prior to a function. In that event, if alcohol is served, non-alcoholic beverages must also be made available.

PPCC 2015 Annual Security Report 51

Additionally, all students and faculty traveling as a part of a college course or student group sign waivers that state, in part:

Student: “I further understand that I am expected to adhere to the Standards of Conduct and to all policies and procedures of Pikes Peak Community College. Actions such as, but not limited to, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dishonesty, forgery, disorderly conduct, indecent or obscene conduct, gambling, infringement upon the rights of others, possession, distribution or consumption of alcohol or illegal drugs and unauthorized use of prescription drugs are prohibited by the Standards of Conduct.”

Faculty/Advisor: “I also recognize that this is a college sponsored program/activity and I agree to abide by all college policies, as well as State and Federal laws on the course/program/activity. This includes omitting the use of alcohol and illicit drugs, and not bringing or using any weapons.”

Copies of the complete Student/Participant Waiver Form and the Faculty/Advisor Waiver of Rights, Assumption of Risks, and Release of Liability Agreement are included in Appendix C.

Other Drugs

The sale, manufacture, distribution, use, and/or possession of illegal drugs are prohibited.

Although possession and use of marijuana consistent with the requirements of the Colorado Constitution is no longer a crime in the State of Colorado, the possession and use of marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Consistent with federal law, including the Controlled Substances Act and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, the use and/or possession of marijuana continues to be prohibited while a student is on college owned or college controlled property, and/or any function authorized or supervised by the college and/or in state owned or leased vehicles.

This prohibition applies even if the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has issued a Medical Marijuana Registry identification card to an individual, permitting that individual to possess a limited amount of marijuana for medicinal purposes. Those with medical marijuana cards are not permitted to use medical marijuana on campus.

Smoking on College Grounds

Pikes Peak Community College campuses must be open and accessible to the general public in order to fulfill the role and mission of the College. In order to promote a healthy environment for the College community, and to comply with Colorado Governor’s Executive Order D0036 90, smoking is prohibited in all PPCC buildings and facilities.

“Smoking,” as used in this policy, includes, but is not limited to:

  • Smoking tobacco products such as cigars, cigarettes and pipes;
  • Cloves, bidis, kreteks and other herbal cigarettes;
  • Electronic smoking devices (e-cigarettes or vapor cigarettes);
  • Marijuana, marijuana products and hashish; and
  • Illegal drugs (e.g. cocaine, heroin, opium, methamphetamine).

Smoking of tobacco products and the use of electronic smoking devices is allowed only in designated smoking areas at the Centennial, Rampart Range, and the Downtown Studio campuses.

High school students (Career Start and CE), regardless of age, who attend the College are prohibited from smoking while on PPCC property.

Military sites will comply with all rules and regulations for those installations.

Smoking marijuana products is prohibited on all PPCC campuses. Although possession and use of marijuana consistent with the requirements of the Colorado Constitution is no longer a crime in the State of Colorado, the possession and use of marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Consistent with federal law, including the Controlled Substances Act and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, the use and/or possession of marijuana continues to be prohibited on college-owned or college-controlled property, and/or any function authorized or supervised by the college and/or in state owned or leased vehicles.

Designated Smoking Areas

Smoking is permitted in designated smoking areas only at Centennial, Rampart Range, and the Downtown Studio Campuses.

Smoking is not permitted in any campus courtyard, at the Centennial Campus bus stop, or while walking to and from parking lots, bus stops, and buildings at all campuses.

Smoking materials must be discarded in designated receptacles.

Violations of College smoking policies may result in a citation and/or fine, as well as student or employee disciplinary action.

Centennial Campus Designated Smoking Areas

  • On the service drive, southwest corner
  • On the service drive, southeast corner
  • At the northwest entrance off of A lot

Rampart Campus Designated Smoking Area

  • Northeast corner at the old bus stop

Downtown Studio Campus Designated Smoking Area

  • West side near the ramp exit/entrance

Sexual Harassment

Pikes Peak Community College is firmly committed to maintaining a work and learning environment where students, faculty, and staff are treated with dignity and respect. Sexual harassment and acts of discrimination are illegal, often demeaning for the individual student or employee, and can disrupt the College’s positive learning and working environment. As such, all members of the College community have a responsibility to be aware of what behaviors constitute sexual harassment, to be responsible for their own actions, and to help create an environment free of sexual harassment.

Pikes Peak Community College defines sexual harassment as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when one or more of the following criteria are met:

  • Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or of academic status in a course, program, or activity.
  • Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for employment or academic educational decisions affecting such individual.
  • Such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive so as to have the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work and/or academic educational performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work and/or learning environment.

Furthermore, retaliation against any person for filing a complaint, participating in, or cooperating in an investigation is prohibited.

If you believe that you have been sexually harassed or that you have been retaliated against by anyone in your work and/or academic activities at Pikes Peak Community College, you should report this conduct immediately so that an inquiry into your complaint may commence without delay. You may report this conduct to an officer of the College, instructional dean, division/department director, or a Human Resource Services representative. Substantiated complaints may result in disciplinary action up to and including expulsion from the College.

The College has designated the Executive Director of Human Resource Services as its Equal Opportunity Education/Employment Compliance Officer. Inquiries and/or complaints may be referred to the Human Resource Services office by e-mail, hrs@ppcc.edu, or by calling 719-502-2600. The EEO Compliance Officer or designate will investigate all credible allegations of sexual harassment in a timely manner and in accordance with its official complaint investigation procedure.

Complaints may also be referred to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1244 Speer Boulevard, Cesar E. Chavez Memorial Bldg., Suite 310, Denver, Colorado 80204, 303-844-5695.

AIDS Policy

Current knowledge indicates that individuals with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS Related Complex (ARC), or a positive test for antibody to the Human T-Lymphotrophic Virus Type III (HTLV-III/HIV) do not pose a health risk to others in a non-laboratory academic setting. According to current medical data, the virus is not transmitted by casual contact. Based on this knowledge, individuals sharing common work or study areas, libraries, classrooms, recreational facilities, cafeterias, and theaters do not present a problem or public health threat to the College community. Laboratories and/or programs dealing with body fluids will teach and practice universal precautionary procedures.

Students or employees of Pikes Peak Community College who are or may become infected with the AIDS virus will not be excluded from enrollment or employment or restricted in their access to College services or facilities unless medically-based judgments indicate restriction is necessary for the welfare of the individual or other members of the College community. There will be no mandatory screening of prospective or current students or employees for the AIDS virus; harassment or discrimination against people infected with the AIDS virus will not be tolerated. Further, the strictest principles of confidentiality will be maintained in management of personal medical information, as provided by law.

Currently, there is no cure for AIDS. Prevention of the disease through education is crucial. The College is committed to ongoing awareness efforts through its curriculum, student and staff activities, and community events.

Firearms on Campus

State Board Policy states that no person may have on his or her person any unauthorized firearm, ammunition, explosive device, or illegal weapon on campus or any facility used by a college. Persons authorized to carry firearms and other equipment defined in the policy are:

  • those persons conducting and participating in an approved program of instruction in the college’s curriculum which requires access to such equipment as an integral part of the instructional program;
  • certified peace officers;
  • those persons who have been issued a valid permit to carry a concealed handgun in accordance with Colorado’s Concealed Carry Act, C.R.S. § 18-12-201, et seq. and who are acting in compliance with the requirements of that Act; and
  • those persons granted permission at the discretion of the college president for specific purposes from time to time.

Concealed Handgun Permit holders exercising their rights pursuant to Item #3 above are responsible for preventing the casual or inadvertent display of their handgun.

It shall not be an offense if the weapon remains inside a locked motor vehicle upon the real estate owned by the State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education.

In accordance with Colorado Statute CRS 18-12-214(3), under no circumstances may a person other than a certified peace officer carry a firearm or other equipment defined in Board Policy onto the real property, or into any improvements erected thereon, of a public elementary, middle, junior high, or high school. This provision applies to The Classical Academy (TCA) facility, which is located on PPCC’s Rampart Range Campus and owned by School District 20.

In accordance with Colorado Statute CRS 18-12-214(3)(a), a concealed weapon permittee may have a handgun on the real property of the public school so long as the handgun remains in his or her vehicle and, if the permittee is not in the vehicle, the handgun is in a compartment within the vehicle and the vehicle is locked.

Violations of the college firearms policy may result in criminal prosecution. Questions should be directed to the Department of Campus Police.

Parking and Traffic Regulations

The Pikes Peak Community College Centennial Campus and Rampart Range Campus will provide OPEN parking in all general lots, supported by a student fee paid at registration. These include C, D, and E lots at Centennial and lots one through five at Rampart Range. At Centennial Campus only, motorcycles may be parked in the designated marked areas in lots D and E. At Rampart Range Campus, motorcycles may park in the designated area in lot 2.

Those wishing to obtain a “hang tag” must do so by bringing student/staff identification to the Campus Police office at the Centennial and Rampart Range Campuses. Those wishing to obtain a “hang tag” at the Downtown Studio Campus (DTSC) must bring student/staff identification to the Student Life Office at the DTSC. It provides the following benefits:

  • Easy notification in case of an emergency involving the vehicle.
  • The hang tag is valid for the student’s entire career at PPCC.

Speed limits on campus are 25 M.P.H. on perimeter road and Rampart road unless otherwise posted, and they are 10 M.P.H. in the parking lots. Pedestrians always have the right of way. For the safety of all, DO NOT park in service drives, crosswalks, or roadways. Violators may be ticketed.

Enforcement Authority: By Colorado Revised Statutes 23-5-107. Authority of Governing Boards, Parking.

Handicap Parking: Vehicles bearing state issued handicapped placards, state issued handicapped license plates, or state issued temporary handicapped passes may park in the handicapped areas in lots A, the designated all handicap lot, and on South Service Drive at the Centennial Campus and in the handicapped areas in lots one, two and three at the Rampart Range Campus. Only vehicles identified as belonging to handicapped persons displaying the state issued handicapped placards/license plates may park in the handicapped areas.

At the Centennial Campus only: Visitor Parking: A-Lot Visitor Parking for those on short-term business with the College. These visitor parking spots are for the convenience of College visitors and not for use by students, faculty, or staff. Those who park at the one hour visitor parking spots can receive a ticket if they are parked there for more than one hour. Visitors whose business will take longer than the visitor parking allow should use the parking spaces in C, D, and E lots.

Traffic Violations: The Department of Campus Police (DCP) will issue citations which may include fines and/or vehicle impoundment for both parking and moving violations occurring on College property. Summons and Penalty Assessments must be answered in El Paso County Court. College Citations for parking violations will result in a fine which must be paid to the College cashier in A-101 at Centennial Campus or S-102 at Rampart Range Campus, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday–Thursday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday.

The registered owner of the vehicle or identified user of the vehicle shall be held liable for all violations.

Appeals: If a person wants to appeal a parking citation, he/she must submit a statement in writing before the tenth working day from the date of the citation. Appeal forms are available in room A-100 at Centennial Campus and N-106 at Rampart Range Campus. The Director of Campus Police reviews the appeals and mails them back to the appropriate person.

Mopeds and Bicycles: Service decals are not required for bicycles or mopeds. Parking for these vehicles is available at the Centennial Campus outside the main entrance to A-building, by A-121, and at Rampart Range Campus outside the main entrance. Bicycles or mopeds locked or parked in hazardous locations will have the lock or chain cut, and the vehicle will be impounded by Department of Campus Police for safekeeping.

Accidents: Colorado law requires that all accidents be reported to the proper authorities. Accidents occurring on PPCC Campuses must be reported to the Department of Campus Police at 719-502-2911.

Information concerning PPCC vehicle regulations may be obtained from Department of Campus Police in A-100, or by calling ext. 2900 at the Centennial Campus and in N-106 at the Rampart Range Campus.

Safety Escort Service: Safety Escort Service is available through the Department of Campus Police, contact 719-502-2911.

Days of Enforcement

Parking and traffic regulations are enforced on all College properties. Handicapped parking violations are enforced at all times.

Emergencies and Crime Reporting

For emergencies dial 911.

The emergency number 911 should only be used in emergency situations when a police officer, fire fighter, or paramedic is needed right away. If you are ever in doubt, call 911. 911 should not be used for non-emergencies.

All emergencies and suspected criminal actions must be promptly reported to the Department of Campus Police. Campus Police officials will take whatever action is deemed necessary to protect life and property and to enforce all Federal and State laws and regulations.

The Department of Campus Police monitors and records all known criminal activities associated with the College, including criminal activity associated with off-campus student organizations.

The Crime Prevention section of the Department of Campus Police offers programs to the campus community. Operation Identification and 911 Readiness are offered for children at the Child Development Centers. Operation Identification kits may be picked up at any Campus Police office.

The Colorado State Legislature has granted authority to commissioned officers of the Department of Campus Police to enforce all laws and regulations. Officers work in cooperation with State and local law enforcement agencies.

Emergency Notification

Each campus uses various forms of communication as indicated below. Recognizing the high number of part time employees, adjunct instructors and turnover among students in our college community, emergency communication will be in plain language rather than code. Each classroom, office, or work area is equipped with a “flip chart” style Emergency Response Guide (ERG), which lists the most common types of emergencies alphabetically and provides clear, bulleted and step-by-step guidance on what specific actions to take during any one particular emergency.

Centennial Campus:

All PPCC campuses, staff, students and faculty, are served by the Blackboard Connect emergency mass notification system.

Persons are invited to sign up, at no cost, through the college web site at www.ppcc.edu/public-safety/notification. The Mass Emergency Notification system allows the college to send emergency messages to its entire community via e-mail, text (SMS), and/or voice mail to users’ cell and / home phones. Users, however, must subscribe and “opt in” to the service. Standard text messaging costs may apply. Blackboard Connect messages are broadcast at the direction of any member of the Policy Group or Director of Campus Police or any of their respective representatives. Blackboard Connect messages are published and distributed by the Chief Technology Officer or his representative.

Centennial Campus alarm system is also equipped with a public announcement system (PA) for Aspen, Breckenridge, Student Center and Faculty Offices Buildings. This system will be used to announce any event or emergency.

The Centennial Campus is also equipped with multiple strategically placed LCD television screens capable of broadcasting both “screen shot” and scrolling messages. When necessary and appropriate, the Chief Technology Officer or his representative will update the messages to inform the college community of emergency situations.

Emergency messages will be communicated to the Child Development Center (CDC) by a Campus Police employee speaking with the Director or Manager of the CDC.

Emergency messages will be communicated to the Police Training Center/Firing Range (CDC) by a Campus Police employee speaking with on-duty personnel at the Center/Range.

Emergency messages will be communicated to the Grounds Shop by a Campus Police employee speaking with on-duty personnel at the Shop.

Rampart Range Campus:

All PPCC campuses, staff, students and faculty, are served by the Blackboard Connect emergency mass notification system. Persons are invited to sign up, at no cost, through the college web site at www.ppcc.edu/public-safety/notification. The Mass Emergency Notification system allows the college to send emergency messages to its entire community via e-mail, text (SMS), and/or voice mail to users’ cell and home phones. Users, however, must subscribe and “opt in” to the service. Standard text messaging costs may apply. Blackboard Connect messages are broadcast at the direction of any member of the Policy Group or Director of Campus Police or any of their respective representatives. Blackboard Connect messages are published and distributed by the Chief Technology Officer or his representative.

The Rampart Range Campus alarm system is also equipped with a public announcement system (PA) for the Main Building. This system will be used to announce any event or emergency.

The Rampart Range Campus is also equipped with multiple strategically placed LCD television screens capable of broadcasting both “screen shot” and scrolling messages. When necessary and appropriate, the Chief Technology Officer or his representative will update the messages to inform the college community of emergency situations.

Emergency messages will be communicated to the Child Development Center (CDC) by a Campus Police employee speaking with the Director or Manager of the CDC.

Emergency messages will be communicated to The Classical Academy (TCA) by a Campus Police employee speaking with on-duty personnel there.

Specific rooms and/or wings of the campus will be notified by designated college personnel, when reasonable to do so, going room to room to advise of the emergency.

The Downtown Studio Campus:

All PPCC campuses, staff, students and faculty, are served by the Blackboard Connect emergency mass notification system. Persons are invited to sign up, at no cost, through the college web site at www.ppcc.edu/public-safety/notification. The Mass Emergency Notification system allows the college to send emergency messages to its entire community via e-mail, text (SMS), and/or voice mail to users’ cell and home phones. Users, however, must subscribe and “opt in” to the service. Standard text messaging costs may apply. Blackboard Connect messages are broadcast at the direction of any member of the Policy Group or Director of Campus Police or any of their respective representatives. Blackboard Connect messages are published and distributed by the Chief Technology Officer or his representative.

The Downtown Studio Campus is also equipped with one LCD television screen mounted in the Student Lounge capable of broadcasting both “screen shot” and scrolling messages. When necessary and appropriate, the Chief Technology Officer or his representative will update the messages to inform the college community of emergency situations.

Specific rooms and/or wings of the campus will be notified by designated college personnel, when reasonable to do so, going room to room to advise of the emergency.

Reporting Criminal Offenses

To report any emergency, dial 911 or pick-up any Emergency phone located through-out campus buildings and parking lots.

Violent crimes considered a threat to students and employees are promptly reported to the campus community.

Rioting Offenses

Prohibition against enrollment in state-supported institutions of higher education of persons convicted of rioting offenses:

Under Colorado law, no person shall be enrolled in a state-supported institution of higher education for a period of twelve months following the date of a guilty verdict, guilty plea, no contest plea, or a deferred judgment and sentence for inciting riot, arming rioters, or engaging in a riot.

Sex Offender Registration

In accordance with the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000, the Campus Police Office shall maintain a list of all sex offenders who are currently enrolled or employed at Pikes Peak Community College and make said list available to students and employees. All sex offenders are required to register in the state of Colorado and to provide notice of each institution of higher education in Colorado at which the person is employed, carries a vocation or is a student.

List of sex offenders registered at the College are maintained online at www.ppcc.edu/campus-police/.

Campus Crime and Security Report

The Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act, a public law, requires the College to disclose information regarding criminal activities and security at Pikes Peak Community College and/or on adjacent public properties.

No crimes were determined to be hate related.

Report of Criminal Offenses

Centennial Campus

Offense (Includes attempts) 2015 2016 2017
Murder & Non-Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 2 0 1
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 1 0 1
Burglary 3 1 2
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 1 0
Dating Violence 2 0 0
Domestic Violence 4 1 1
Stalking 4 5 1
Arson 0 0 0
Failure to Appear Warrant Arrests 0 0 0
Arrests Made
Liquor Law Violations 0 0 0
Drug Law Violations 0 1 1
Weapons Law Violations 0 0 0
Non-Clery Reportable Crimes
Larceny 8 12 20
Failure to Appear Warrant Arrests 0 0 0

No crimes were determined to be hate related.

Downtown Studio Campus

Offense (Includes attempts) 2015 2016 2017
Murder & Non-Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 1 0
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Dating Violence 0 0 0
Domestic Violence 0 0 0
Stalking 0 0 0
Arson 1 0 0
Arrests Made
Liquor Law Violations 0 0 0
Drug Law Violations 0 0 0
Weapons Law Violations 0 1 0
Non-Clery Reportable Crimes
Larceny 1 2 3
Failure to Appear Warrant Arrests 0 0 0

No crimes were determined to be hate related.

Rampart Range Campus

Offense (Includes attempts) 2015 2016 2017
Murder & Non-Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses 0 1 0
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0
Dating Violence 0 0 0
Domestic Violence 0 0 0
Stalking 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0
Arrests Made
Liquor Law Violations 1 0 0
Drug Law Violations 0 0 1
Weapons Law Violations 0 1 0
Non-Clery Reportable Crimes
Larceny 1 1 1
Failure to Appear Warrant Arrests 0 0 0